Jan 27, 2020  
2018-2019 Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


As a reminder, all courses have been renumbered beginning with the Fall 2018 semester. Click on the new Course Number Look-up Tool and/or go to colum.edu/registrar

 
  
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    HIST 267H Public History: Presenting & Interpreting the Past: Honors


    This course introduces students to the field of Public History, a set of theories, methods, assumptions, and practices guiding the identification, preservation, interpretation, and presentation of historical artifacts, texts, structures, and landscapes in conjunction with and for the public.(Public History Resource Center) Through field trips, readings, lectures and films, students explore how various stakeholders, both non-profit and commercial, conceive and convey history for public consumption. The course is hands-on and takes full advantage of Columbia’s city campus through visits to museums, cultural institutions, architectural sites, historical monuments, libraries, etc. This is an Honors course and incoming freshman students need to be admitted to the Honors Program to register.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-2676HN
    HI
    Requirements Freshman Only (FF14)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 268 The History of the Future


    This course provides a historical survey of the way in which western people, from the ancient world to modern times, perceive and respond to ideas and visions of the future.  Often these concerns are rooted in the problems the society is currently facing. This course is concerned with themes such as:  utopian thought, robots, social reactions to technological change, science fiction, world’s fairs as cultural optimism, dystopian fears, and apocalyptic predictions and the techniques and literature of contemporary futurists.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-2776
    HI
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 302 The Vietnam War in History, Literature and the Arts


    The Vietnam War is one of the most studied, documented, and argued about wars in American history. The debate has taken the form of historical inquiries, poetry, novels, film, music, and other arts. The war shaped the experiences of a generation and continues to affect American life and arts. The interdisciplinary course examines the conflict in Southeast Asia through the eyes of journalists, fiction writers, poets, historians, filmmakers, musicians, and other artists. Content emphasizes American involvement.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3690
    HI PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 321H The Enlightenment: Honors


    Learning about the Enlightenment as a complex, trans-national intellectual movement, we will focus in this class on the Enlightenment in Paris, its heart. Issues studied will vary by semester, and may include science, social satire, women’s roles in the Enlightenment, the development of a public sphere, the use of fictional literature to ?do? Enlightenment, commerce, education and epistemology, political thought, penal reform, aesthetics, racial and gender theory, the transmission of ideas, and the question of how the Enlightenment may be linked to the French Revolution of 1789. This is an Honors class and students need a GPA of 3.50 or higher to register.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3301HN
    HI GA
    Requirements Sophomore Standing or Above (SO) and 3.5 or Higher GPA (35GP)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 322H Taste and Consumption in French History: Honors


    We tend to associate all things French, whether fashions, luxury goods, fine restaurants, champagne, or French women themselves, with good taste and chic. This course explores how notions of taste and practices of consumption have changed in France from ca. 1650 to ca. 1914, from the absolutist court to the modern department store. Against a historical background of dramatic economic, political, social and cultural change, we will explore how aesthetic, consumerist and critical practices associated with taste became shifting, highly charged and contested markers of individual and group (e.g., national, class and gender) identity and even political position, and will examine different historically-applied theories about the motives that have driven or inspired people to consume, use and display certain goods or appreciate particular aesthetic forms. We will read primary and secondary sources (none in French). This course provides comparative historical insight to help students understand the historicity of the contemporary classed and gendered consumption regimes in which we live today. This class may require a small amount of additional expenditure of monies for required excursions (usually no more than $30 This is an Honors class. In addition to other possible pre-requisites, students need a minimum G.P.A. of 3.50 or higher to enroll.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3353HN
    HI GA
    Requirements 3.5 or Higher GPA (35GP) and Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 351 American Cultural History


    This course examines major trends in American cultural and intellectual history from the Colonial period to the present. We explore the ideas of those who, either from a dominant or an alternative position, had an important impact on their contemporaries’ views, and who best reflected the spirit of their time. It is highly recommended that students have completed at least one prior course in U.S. History.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3665
    HI PL
    Prerequisites ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 352 Harlem Renaissance: 1918-1935


    Period of artistic experimentation among black creative artists in the 1920s is studied through the works of black writers from the Harlem Renaissance. Their relationship with emerging American avant-garde writers and the evolution of the Afro-American literary tradition is explored.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3101
    HI PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 353 Oral History: The Art of the Interview


    After an introduction to the theoretical and philosophical concerns in the practice of oral history, various methods and uses of oral history will be explored. Students will learn the techniques of background research, script formulation, interviewing, transcribing, and editing. Each semester the class will partner with an existing oral history project and every student will contribute a fully transcribed, 60-90 minute interview to the project’s permanent collection. This course requires permission from the instructor.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3672
    HI
    Requirements Permission Required (DP)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 353H Oral History: The Art of the Interview: Honors


    The foundation of this multi-layered, applied history course is immersion into a specific period in United States history to acquire the contextual knowledge necessary to conduct a well-informed oral history interview. After an extensive introduction into the field of oral history and the discipline’s methodology, a series of colloquiums on question formulation, script development, interviewing techniques, and transcription standards are held. Finally, after the interview and full transcription is completed, each student will present a content analysis and edit of their interview. All interviews will be archived with an established oral history project. This is an Honors class. In addition to other possible pre-requisites, students need a minimum G.P.A. of 3.50 or higher to enroll.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3672HN
    HI
    Requirements 3.5 or Higher GPA (35GP)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 354 The Great Depression & the New Deal: the U.S. in the 1930s


    This upper level history course will explore the Great Depression, from the election of Herbert Hoover in 1928 to the start of WWII, from three main perspectives: the changing role of the presidency and the politics of the period, the social response to the economic crisis, and the cultural innovation of the era. Through readings and the examination of primary sources including songs, speeches, films, poems, plays students will explore the relationship between the individual and the time in which s/he lives and complete a research project on Chicago during the Great Depression. Special emphasis will be given to the creative fervor of an unusual chapter in US history and the artistic and documentary production of the decade.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3678
    HI PL
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 354H The Great Depression & the New Deal: the U.S. in the 1930s: Honors


    This course will explore the Great Depression and the decade of the 1930s, from the election of Hebert Hoover in 1928 to bombing Pearl Harbor, from three main perspectives: the politics of FDR and the New Deal, the social response to the Depression and the president, and the cultural innovation of the era. Through reading and the examination of primary sources (including songs, speeches, films, poems and plays) students will explore the relationship between the individual and time to which s/he lives. Special emphasis will be given to the artistic and documentary production of the decade. This is an Honors class. In addition to other possible pre-requisites, students need a minimum G.P.A. of 3.50 or higher to enroll.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3678HN
    HI PL
    Requirements 3.5 or Higher GPA (35GP)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 355 History of Chicago


    Content examines Chicago’s economic, ethnic, racial, and political development from the early French exploration to the current urban crisis. Students develop knowledge concerning the impact of technological change on Chicago and the economic and demographic forces that have helped shape the city’s history.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3680
    HI
    Prerequisites ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 381 The Black Atlantic


    This course will explore interrelations between the old and new worlds in the 19th and 20th centuries. The effects of voluntary and forced migration on the development of racial consciousness, capital markets, economics, and social classes will be discussed. Africa (Ghana, Senegal, and South Africa), Europe (Great Britain, France, and Portugal), North America, and the Caribbean (the USA, Jamaica, Cuba and Haiti), South America (Brazil, Argentina) will be utilized as models. Requirements include significant readings, films, and other assignments.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 49-3774
    HI
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 399H Topics in History: Honors


    Series of courses that deal with specific topics or themes in history. Course is repeatable as topic changes. This is an Honors course and in addition to any other prerequisites, students need a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher to register.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 49-2700HN
    HI GA
    Requirements 3.5 or Higher GPA (35GP)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HIST 496 Independent Project: History


    An independent study is designed by the student, with the approval of a supervising faculty member, to study an area that is not presently available in the curriculum. Prior to registration, the student must submit a written proposal that outlines the project.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 49-3798
    Requirements Permission Required (DP)
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 6

  
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    HUMA 102 Introduction to Black World Studies


    In this interdisciplinary survey course, students are introduced to the socio-political history and culture of black peoples around the world and the concept of blackness. The course is team taught and divided up into units that cover inter-related components: history, humanities, and social sciences. The course is divided into seven units, beginning with a history of the field of Black Studies. Students will then be taken through the history and historiography of the peoples and their expressive arts.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2105
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 103 Introduction to Latin American Studies


    This interdisciplinary humanities course serves as a basic introduction to the social, historical and cultural complexity of Latin America and the Caribbean Basin. From Pre-Columbian times to the contemporary moment, the course examines issues of colonialism and sovereignty, indigeneity, cultural diversity and cultural difference, modernity, postmodernity, and globalization through a variety of historical documents and drawing on all the arts–especially film, literature, music, fine arts and popular culture.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1215
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 104 Introduction to Women and Gender Studies


    This course will introduce students to the broad variety of scholarship on women through an interdisciplinary approach. The course will begin with an exploration of the history of women’s rights movements. It continues with the examination of the social construction of gender, gender roles, sexuality and power. With this background, we will explore a wide variety of topics, ranging from media to spirituality, using the tools of feminist analysis.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1211
    HU PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 105 Gay and Lesbian Studies I: 1600 to 1980


    This course is Part I of a two-part course called Gay and Lesbian Studies. The material in Part I focuses on the GLBT community from 1600-1980. The course explores the contributions of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals to historical and contemporary U.S. culture. Readings, films, and guest lecturers will help establish the necessary sociological and historical context for the course.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1270
    HU PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 106 Gay and Lesbian Studies II: 1980 to Present


    The course explores contributions of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals to contemporary culture (1980-Present). An interdisciplinary course, the final class project encourages students to work within their fields of interest. Several films are viewed in class; some are assigned for out-of-class viewing. Class visitors from Columbia College Chicago and other Chicago-area institutions will address issues covered in class.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1271
    HU PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 110 Western Humanities


    This course introduces the historical, intellectual, and aesthetic development of the ideas, values, arts, and traditions of western culture through a survey of art, architecture, literature, music, philosophy, and religion.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1101
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 111 Eastern Humanities


    Eastern Humanities is designed to introduce students to some of the major issues and works in Eastern humanities through, among other things, popular, everyday cultural texts and practices, the media, literature (oral and written), philosophy, music, and the arts-and also, to begin to acquaint them with the wider historical, social, political, and cultural context of these works, as well as with the enormous diversity and complexity of Eastern societies and cultures.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1102
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 112 Humanities for the Performing Artist


    Major texts of literature, philosophy, and theology are studied as examples of humanistic inquiry, providing the context for performance pieces expressing universal themes. Guest artists from the Dance, Theater, and Music Departments assist advanced performing arts students in deepening their artistic understanding by widening their humanistic context.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1103
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 113 Humanities for the Visual Artist


    Poems, masterpieces of fiction and philosophy, and a Shakespearean play are the bases for an exploration of imagery as a vehicle for interdisciplinary humanistic study. Course is ideal for art, film, and photography students who want to place their disciplines within a larger humanistic context.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1104
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 120 Women in Art, Literature, and Music


    Course examines the professional development of women, the impact of images of women on art and society, and the role of cultural contexts for artistic expression.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1112
    HU PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 121 Latin American Art, Literature, and Music


    Interdisciplinary humanities course provides an overview of the rich and diverse contributions of art, literature, and music of Mexico, Central America, and South America. Students learn the terminology used to describe, interpret, and appreciate these arts in the context of the culture they reflect.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1111
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 122 Latin American Women in the Arts


    This course is designed to study the contributions which Latin American women have made (and continue to make) through literary and visual arts. We will examine issues of cultural identity, feminism, and representation through various genres including drama, essays, film, literature, mythology, photography, poetry, and theology.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1113
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 122H Latin American Women in the Arts: Honors


    This course is designed to study the artistic contributions that Latin American women have made (and continue to make) through literary, visual and performing arts. From Mexican nuns in the 17th century to Colombian punk rockers in the 1990s and Argentine digital filmmakers in the 2000s, the course will examine theoretical issues of subjectivity and cultural identity; feminist positionings and political agency; and the complex representations of femininity/masculinity, motherhood and patriarchy. This is an Honors class. In addition to other possible pre-requisites, students need a minimum G.P.A. of 3.50 or higher to enroll.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1113HN
    HU GA
    Requirements 3.5 or Higher GPA (35GP)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 123 United States in Art, Lit and Music


    Course presents a representative selection of American paintings, folk and folk-derived music, and readings in poetry and the short story to enhance the students’ understanding of each period in American social history.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1110
    HU PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 199 Topics in Humanities


    Topic changes.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-1221
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 210 Black World Ritual Performance


    An exploration of the acts and meanings of performance and ritual in the Black world. Study of sacred and secular practices that influence theatre, ritual, ceremony, carnival, rites of passage, the blues, improvisation, Negro Spirituals, the word (as in: spoken-word, playwriting, use of physical voice as a tool, of specific characters in film), performance art, representation and perceptions of the black body, performance as expressed in sports culture, hip-hop, storytelling, and other performative modes of expression rooted in the ancestral ethos of Africans in the Diaspora.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2102
    HU PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 211 Black Arts Movement


    The 1960s was a period when many revolutionary Black Americans, artists, dramatists, writers, critics and philosophers engaged in intense debates over the role of the artist in the making of a cultural revolution, and over what constitutes a genuine or true black aesthetic. The Black Arts Movement explicitly targeted a number of long-standing assumptions of literary critics and historians; in particular, the role of the text, the timelessness of art, the responsibility of artists to their communities, and the significance of oral forms in cultural struggles.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2104
    HU PL
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 212 Contemporary African Film, Literature, and Music


    This course presents the major issues, as well as the regional and cultural differences that exist amongst the peoples of present-day Africa. The class will critically review the stereotypical myths which are usually associated with Africa. Through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, including literary and musical analysis, students will be introduced to the diverse cultures and traditions across Africa as well as the important political, social, and economic issues of post-colonial African nations.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2112
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 213 Afro-Futurism: Pathways to Liberation


    Afro-Futurism provides artistic methods for the exploration of Black liberation. The creative ability to manifest transformation has been essential to the survival of Blacks in the Diaspora. This course considers what Blackness and liberation could look like in the future, real or imagined. It is rooted African cosmologies, using pieces of the past, technological and analog, to build the future. Themes include: identity; hybridity; alien and alienation; belonging, immigration, and migration; and the vessel–corporeal and metaphoric–as vehicle of liberation.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2216
    HU PL
    Prerequisites ENGL 109 Writing and Rhetoric I Stretch B  or ENGL 111 Writing and Rhetoric I  or ENGL 111H Writing and Rhetoric I: Honors  or ENGL 121 International Writing and Rhetoric I  or TWC-T-7 EXAM-TWC WRITING MINIMUM SCORE = 7  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 214 Critical Vocabulary for the Arts


    Course probes ideas and terminology that help students enjoy and appraise achievements in the arts. Students experience performing and visual arts and explore how art is created and perceived.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2103
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  
  •  

    HUMA 216 Death and Dying


    Universal and timeless, dying and death are life experiences integral to human existence. What and how we experience, give order to, make sense of, and live out these journeys in our lives and in relation to others within societal, cultural, philosophical and spiritual contexts will be the focus of our course of study.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2272
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 217 The Simpsons as Satirical Authors


    This course will study the postmodern satirical presentations and commentary which The Simpsons has made (and continues to make) through its utilization of the humanities. We will examine how The Simpsons raises and comments on issues of civic, cultural, gender, global and political identities using traditional humanities studies including artistic, film, literary, philosophical and religious critiques. Special emphasis will focus on self-referentiality and how The Simpsons satirizes both itself and its characters as an operative principle and strategy.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2213
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 218 Caribbean Art, Literature and Music


    This course surveys art, literature, and music in Caribbean culture. Students learn to understand historical references within countries represented in this survey. Students will develop an appreciation for the Caribbean art forms by surveying and recognizing important artistic movements, literary works, and cultural revolutions in which artists played a role in influencing 20th century and 21st century art in the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2218
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 219H The Italian Renaissance: Honors


    This is an interdisciplinary humanities class in the Italian Renaissance, a period of time that marked a shift in sensibilities in which human values in all fields were reborn and reaffirmed amidst political and religious crises. A new self-awareness, the return to humane letters and to classical antiquity created an outburst of creativity. During a time of rapid change, mankind discovered a capacity to improve, to change the world, to grow, learn and to create. We will examine how artists, bankers, diplomats, courtiers, princes, philosophers, merchants, patrons and religious leaders responded to these new values through which they affirmed their individualism, often through many-sided achievements, to wit, Michalangelo ( sculptor, painter, poet) DaVinci (painter, scientist, inventor) Alberti (painter, architect, humanist) the Medici (bankers, poets, patrons). This class integrates readings in literature, art history, history, philosophy and political science. Through readings, lectures, images and class discussions we will study how political, religious and historical events contributed to the artistic achievements of the Italian Renaissance and its lasting impact in today’s world. This is an Honors class. In addition to other possible pre-requisites, students need a minimum G.P.A. of 3.50 or higher to enroll.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2219HN
    HU GA
    Requirements 3.5 or Higher GPA (35GP)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 220 Critiquing Children’s Culture


    This course examines varied spheres of children’s culture while introducing students to the terms, analytical techniques, and interpretive strategies commonly employed in Cultural Studies. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary approaches to exploring how children’s cultural processes and artifacts are produced, shaped, distributed, consumed and responded to in diverse ways. Through discussion, research and writing, class members investigate dimensions of children’s culture, learning to understand them in their broader social, aesthetic, ethical, and political contexts. Topics studied include children’s literature, animated films, teen literature, toys, public schooling, children’s games and new media.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2212
    HU
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Co-requisites CULS 101 Introduction to Cultural Studies  or  HUMA 104 Introduction to Women and Gender Studies  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 221 Introduction to Digital Humanities


    This course will explore the emergence of the digital humanities as both a disciplinary field of study and a reaction to changes in our culture more broadly. Students will be introduced to the theories, methods, and practices of reading, analysis, writing, and exhibition that comprise the digital humanities. Using tools for distant reading, geotemporal visualization, and data mining, they will develop new ways to conceptualize and communicate the rich landscape of our human cultural existence.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2224
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 222 Nature and Environmentalism in U.S. Culture


    This course explores the relationship between humans and the non-human natural world, emphasizing popular conceptions of nature in American culture and the way in which the very notion of ?nature? itself is a profoundly human conception. We can never really know the natural world ?out there.? Rather the natural world that we seek to understand, even conserve and protect, can only ever be understood through the lens of our social and cultural imagination. What are the socio-cultural manifestations of nature, and how do these manifestations affect the uses and/or abuses of nature in American society?

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2225
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 223 Media, Politics and Intervention


    The media, traditional and new, has been a central aspect of US and global culture, politics, and life over the last several decades. To understand and interrogate the multiple roles, functions, and contexts of media, this course will draw on the critical theoretical legacies and conceptual tools of media studies and cultural studies. This will help students locate media forms, texts, practices, institutions, and industries in their larger social, political, economic, and ideological contexts and to begin to comprehend their histories, present(s), and also imagine their future(s). Combining both critical theoretical work and applied studies of the media, the course takes an interdisciplinary approach and draws freely on the social sciences and the humanities traditions. More specifically, in an attempt to comprehend the whole circuit of media/circuit of culture² (production-text-consumption), the course will engage social and political theory, cultural studies, textual analysis, ethnography, critical political economy, and cultural policy studies, among others. The course will also be addressing key questions including, but NOT limited to, the role of the state; media effects; the politics of the media; the politics of representation, subjectivity and agency; media and ideology; and political activism.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2226
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 224 Urban Images in Media & Film


    Using an interdisciplinary approach, this survey course examines how urban life is portrayed in various media forms. Students will discuss and analyze the way film, television and other forms engage with issues of representation, history, politics, economics, culture, ethnicity, and migration related to the urban environment.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 51-2211
    HU WI
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
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    HUMA 225 Film and Society


    Relationships between people are explored through weekly screenings of feature, short, fiction, documentary, and animated films; all dealing with a semester-long social topic.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2360
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 226 Asian Journeys


    This course examines texts about or by East Asian travelers with journey as the central motif. Texts include those from ancient times to contemporary period, such as classical poetry of retreat and exile, biography, autobiography, and novellas depicting East Asians? encounters with the West during the transitional period from premodern to modern time, the traveling of classical texts within Asia as well as between Asia and the West, and films and critical essays about Asians in migration. Topics of discussion are formation of cultural traditions and individual selfhood, journeys abroad and their impact on self-identities, cultural appropriations, and finally, issues of migration and immigration.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2601
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 227 The Chinese City in Literature, Art, and Media


    This course uses an interdisciplinary humanities approach to Chinese cities from ancient to contemporary times depicted in various literary texts, visual arts, films and other popular media. The course serves both as an exploration of the Chinese city within historical contexts and as an examination of forms of representation. We will discuss themes such as national identity, the garden and intellectual identity, the intersection between China and the foreign, and human responses to the city in perpetual transition to modernity.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-2602
    HU GA
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 310 Peace Studies


    Class studies forces at play in the course of human events that profoundly affect one’s relationship to self, work, family, and others; to social justice; to the earth and its myriad life forms; to the nature and purpose of human existence; and to spirituality.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-3202
    HU
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 311 Posthumanism in Science Fiction


    This course examines science fiction visions of posthumanism. Through film excerpts and readings (novels, philosophy, sociology and science), we will explore fundamental questions of human identity, race and gender. We will also focus on the conflict between the techno-utopian visions of scientists and the techno-dystopian visions of science fiction artists.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-3203
    HU
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 399 Topics in Humanities


    Series of courses that deal with specific topics or themes in humanities. Course is repeatable as topic changes.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 51-2860
    HU
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    HUMA 495 Directed Study: Humanities


    Course consists of learning activities involving student independence within the context of regular guidance and direction from a faculty advisor. Directed Studies are appropriate for students who wish to explore a subject beyond what is possible in regular courses or for students who wish to engage in a subject or activity not otherwise offered that semester by the College. They involve close collaboration with a faculty advisor who will assist in development and design of the project, oversee its progress, evaluate the final results, and submit a grade.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 51-3299
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 4

  
  •  

    HUMA 496 Independent Project: Humanities


    An independent study is designed by the student, with the approval of a supervising faculty member, to study an area that is not presently available in the curriculum. Prior to registration, the student must submit a written proposal that outlines the project.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 51-3298
    Requirements Permission Required (DP)
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 6

  
  •  

    ILLU 203 Illustration: Concept Art


    This course examines the sketching process, using research to solve problems and various types of media to create clear and effective visual presentations.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-2401
    Prerequisites ARTS 105 Foundation Studio   or ARTS 210 Drawing I  or ANIM 105 Animation  or GAME 205 2D Art for Games  or  22 1920 Making 2  
    Requirements Sophomore Standing or Above (SO)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 204 Figure Drawing


    In this course students are provided the opportunity through direct observation of the human form to learn skills in representing the human form using a variety of materials, by concentrating on proportion, light, shape, and movement. Slide discussions of master figure drawings set examples and standards.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 21-2402
    Prerequisites ARTS 105 Foundation Studio  or ARTS 210 Drawing I  or ANIM 105 Animation  or GAME 205 2D Art for Games  or  22 1920 Making 2  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 206 Illustration: Drawing to Print


    This course integrates the fields of illustration and printmaking, with emphasis on technique, playfulness, and personal expression. Students will create drawings through a series of text and image exercises that will result in a finished print design. Basic techniques of linoleum relief carving and printing will be taught, and an edition of original prints will be produced by hand. With focus on traditional media and experimentation, the course will encourage exploration of personal vision within the field of illustration.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 21-2404
    Prerequisites ARTS 105 Foundation Studio  or  22 1920 Making 2  
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 1

  
  •  

    ILLU 212 Figure Drawing and Color


    In this course students create a series of expressive figure drawings through an exploration of projects, media and materials, and process documentation. Contemporary and historical approaches within figurative art and color will be presented and discussed. Utilizing a variety of textures and surfaces, collage and other media, students will be encouraged to seek connections between hand, eye, and mind, using the figure as subject and departure point. Emphasis is on expressive representations of gesture, movement, and form.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 21-2405
    Prerequisites ARTS 105 Foundation Studio  or ARTS 210 Drawing I  or  22 1920 Making 2  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 213 Illustration History & Practice


    This course covers and analyzes the origins of contemporary illustration. The course examines, from a historical perspective, illustrators, illustration trends, styles, and techniques from print to animated motion pictures. Significant illustrators and illustrations are featured throughout the semester. Course objectives are to gain a better appreciation of illustration and its origins, as well as learning to analyze how illustration has reflected and influenced our society and culture today.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3401
    Prerequisites ILLU 203 Illustration: Concept Art  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 214 Illustration Studio I


    This course covers the fundamental process of illustration from conceptual development to application of traditional and digital media for books, magazines, journals, posters, and storyboards. The objectives of the course are to develop, from a historical perspective, the fundamental understanding of illustration as a form of visual expression. and to learn the basic principles of illustration as a form of communication.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3402
    Prerequisites ILLU 203 Illustration: Concept Art  
    Concurrent Requisite ILLU 213 Illustration History & Practice  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 304 Figure Drawing II


    This course focuses on conceptual development, rendering techniques, experimentation, and stylization as a means of communication using clothed and nude models. Various media and techniques are explored.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3404
    Prerequisites ILLU 204 Figure Drawing  or 22 1285 Figurative Sculpture  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 310 History of Political and Social Illustration


    This course explores the history of illustration as a reflection of, comment upon, response to, and protest against society, politics and culture. Through a combination of lectures, journaling, quizzes, and research projects, students will refine their skills of seeing, analyzing, discussing, and writing about illustration. Structured primarily by theme, the lectures trace the boundaries of the illustration medium while providing chronological context.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3405
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 311 BFA Review in Illustration


    This one-credit workshop course prepares Illustration students for a formal review of their work after the first year of study at Columbia College Chicago or, in the case of transfer students, in their first or second semester. Students will apply basic documentation and presentation skills in the preparation of a digital portfolio composed of work in multiple media. A faculty panel will review each portfolio and provide critical response and feedback on individual works and the portfolio as a whole. This review will serve as an advising instrument to guide students in consequent curricular choices.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3400
    Prerequisites ARTS 105 Foundation Studio  or  22 1920 Making 2  
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 1

  
  •  

    ILLU 313 Illustration Studio II


    Professional applications of traditional and/or digital illustration related to a market-based portfolio. Assignments present industry-specific problems which encourage students to examine their process, project conceptualization, and personal style. The objective of this class is to create a collection of artwork for professional portfolio development.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-4401
    Prerequisites ILLU 214 Illustration Studio I  
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR) Illustration Majors Only (M214)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 314 Digital Illustration


    This course helps students begin to master digital painting, drawing, and image processing techniques to extend and augment their skills and techniques with traditional media and methods. Students work with the latest painting and drawing software that digitally mimics traditional tools such as watercolor, oil paint, airbrush, and charcoal. Students also explore methods such as brush effects, compositing, masking, and collage as a resource for initiating, developing, and refining illustration concepts.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3403
    Prerequisites ILLU 214 Illustration Studio I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 320 Cartooning


    This course introduces different aspects and basic techniques of cartoon drawing, emphasizing clear, efficient visual storytelling, the art of composition, and establishing character and environment. Instruction includes the historical study of various types of cartoons (both from print and animation). Styles of cartoons, thematic types, narrative structures, and construction of cartoon characters are analyzed and explored.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3406
    Prerequisites ARTS 210 Drawing I   or ILLU 204 Figure Drawing  or ILLU 203 Illustration: Concept Art  or ANIM 210 Drawing for Animation I  or GAME 205 2D Art for Games  
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 325 Reading Graphically


    The designer learns by seeing and students learn by reading. Reading Graphically takes a studied, methodological approach that combines reading and seeing to arrive at a heightened visual literacy. The ability to parse complex image/text media is the first step in creating it. The course provides a foundation for designers, writers, illustrators, advertisers and anyone else who wants to communicate in visual language. Readings provide a broad survey of print and new media that employs graphic strategy in instructive ways.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-3407
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 330 Special Issues in Illustration


    This course allows students to work with a visiting illustrator to solve a particular illustration problem. Students learn specific technical and creative problem-solving methods from a leading illustrator in Chicago.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 21-3408
    Prerequisites ARTS 105 Foundation Studio  or ARTS 210 Drawing I  or 22 1920 Making 2  
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 3

  
  
  •  

    ILLU 360 Illustration: Materials & Techniques


    Students will be given the opportunity to create innovative illustrations through the hands-on exploration of a series of materials- and techniques-based projects. Contemporary and historical approaches within the field of illustration will be presented and discussed. By engaging with a variety of textures and surfaces, watercolor and gauche painting, ink applications and other media, students will be encouraged to seek deeper connections between seeing, thinking, and making, as it relates to the field of illustration.

    Repeatable: N
    Prerequisites ILLU 214 Illustration Studio I  OR ARTS 220 Painting I  
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 405 Illustration: Experimental Techniques


    In this course, students will create a series of innovative illustrations through the hands-on exploration of unusual materials and techniques, documenting their process in a journal. Contemporary and historical experimental approaches within the field of illustration will be presented and discussed. By engaging with a variety of textures and surfaces, print applications, collage and other media, students will be encouraged to seek deeper connections between seeing, thinking, and making as they compose their illustrations.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 21-4000
    Requirements Sophomore Standing or Above (SO)
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 1

  
  •  

    ILLU 440 Drawing the Graphic Novel


    This course provides students with a means for creative self-discovery and the exploration of complex ideas. Students record their observations, experiences, and memories in a sketchbook and translate this material into various graphic narratives of varying lengths. The class explores the rhythms of storytelling and formal elements of comics. Students learn to compose comic pages using iconic visual language, while experimenting with a variety of tools, media, and approaches.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-4402
    Prerequisites ILLU 320 Cartooning  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 441 Children’s Book Illustration


    Students study the work of children’s book illustrators and their techniques, sources of inspiration, and influences. Students experiment and develop individual graphic and illustrative styles with emphasis on practical application of children’s book illustration for publishing in contemporary markets.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-4403
    Prerequisites ILLU 214 Illustration Studio I   or ILLU 320 Cartooning  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 442 Commercial Illustration


    This course combines analysis and personal expression to convey ideas via illustration. Content includes traditional and non-traditional methods and materials. Students apply previously learned skills and techniques to solve visual problems, as in a professional environment.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-4404
    Prerequisites ILLU 314 Digital Illustration   or ILLU 360 Illustration: Materials & Techniques  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    ILLU 444 Illustration Studio III


    This course assists senior students majoring in illustration with the creation of competitive artwork and assembly of an illustration portfolio. The course also covers professional practices, career strategies, compensation, and industries of employment for illustrators. The objective of this class is to complete a collection of artwork for a portfolio and transition from students to their career.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 21-4406
    Prerequisites ILLU 313 Illustration Studio II  
    Requirements Senior Standing (SR) Illustration Majors Only (M214)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 102 Fundamentals of Interaction


    Contemporary interactive media share a common computational canvas. This course explores technology underlying these media, and introduces students interested in programming and interactive media development to foundational theories and practices in interface design and development. Interaction principles will be explored through practical assignments; sketching, prototyping, and design are essential parts of the development process. Students complete the course with an understanding of participant-centered design, usability, and foundational development terms and concepts.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-1010
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  
  •  

    INMD 114 Web Development I


    Counter to printed compositions, web design and development is about fluid and interactive experiences. This course provides an introduction to programming environments and teaches fundamental skills necessary to prototype and deploy digital media. Using technical elements like variables, conditions, sequences and events, completion of this course will empower students with the ability to design interactive applications.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 36-1420
    Prerequisites MATH 165 Math for Marketing and Management  or MATH 205 Introduction to Statistics  or MATH 210 College Algebra  or ACCU-T-67 EXAM-ACCUPLACER MATH MINIMUM SCORE = 67  or ACT-M-23 EXAM-ACT MATH MINIMUM SCORE = 23  or SAT-M-550 EXAM-SAT MATH MINIMUM SCORE = 550  or CMPS-M-67 EXAM-CMPS MATH MINIMUM SCORE = 67  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 115 Web Design


    One credit hour course offers the student basic skills in designing and creating a Web site. Course will engage students in planning, creating, and defining a site primarily using Macromedia Dreamweaver. Other topics covered will include using text, graphics, and tables, working with layers, image maps, animation, multimedia, drop down menus, rollovers, frames, and forms.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-1114
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 1

  
  •  

    INMD 120 Digital Image Design


    Technical, conceptual and aesthetic skills and concepts will inform an introductory body of work using imaging applications. Idea development, research, vocabulary and critical analysis skills will enhance development of individual voice. This fundamental media art course will also focus on visual design theory, gestalt principles and semiotics.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-1300
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 160 Authoring Interactive Media


    Students research, plan, and produce interactive media projects. Several media components are developed and integrated to support the goal of each piece. Topics covered include contextual problem solving, information architecture, and usability. All projects are designed with participants in mind, considering their culture and demographics. Contemporary authoring technology and content creation tools will be used.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-1601
    Prerequisites INMD 120 Digital Image Design  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 201 Interactive Portfolio Development


    This course will allow students to create an engaging portfolio of interactive work. Students will be encouraged to actively critique their own work as well as the work of their peers. Students will be expected to be aware of their personal branding, professional strengths and abilities, and presentation skills.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 36-3010
    Prerequisites INMD 102 Fundamentals of Interaction  and INMD 160 Authoring Interactive Media  
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 1

  
  •  

    INMD 208 Motion Capture for Artists


    Course provides an introduction to motion capture terms, concepts, and history. Students learn the process of capturing motion data by conceptualizing, planning, and directing on-site sessions. A 3-D character performance is created by converting data from sessions and linking it to a character skeleton created in a computer animation class.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 26-2080
    Prerequisites ANIM 150 Introduction to Computer Animation  or GAME 201 3D Composition for Interactive Media  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 210 Interface Design I


    Course advances students’ practical understanding of media theory, with an emphasis on interactive models of communication. This course focuses on navigational models of interaction design and how to create participant-centered interfaces through research, usability testing, and iterative design. Students produce substantial written critiques to demonstrate their growing understanding of the discipline.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-2110
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 112H Writing and Rhetoric II: Honors  or ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Requirements Sophomore Standing or Above (SO)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 214 Web Development II


    Interactive design and development can narrate any topic. Using methods and techniques exposed in Web Development I, students prototype and iterate work as a means of increasing complexity and refining concept. Throughout this course students gain and apply the project development strategies necessary to research and produce interactive media using professional management strategies.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-2421
    Prerequisites INMD 114 Web Development I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 215 Conversational Interfaces


    Conversation interfaces offer a greater degree of engagement than typical navigational models, and its dependence upon spoken word and audio broaden the reach and application of interactive media beyond visual environments. Students have the opportunity to author highly engaging, writing-centric interactive content. From fiction to non-fiction, poetry to ad copy, this new interaction model offers substantial creative and professional territory for interaction designers and writers alike.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-2130
    Prerequisites ENGL 112 Writing and Rhetoric II  or ENGL 112H Writing and Rhetoric II: Honors  or ENGL 122 International Writing and Rhetoric II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 220 Prototyping Strategies


    Students gain a deeper understanding of techniques and practices by sketching, thumbnailing, storyboarding and making physical mock-ups for digital projects. The iterative production cycle is practiced by rapid prototyping in a collaborative environment, and is informed by research and testing. Each five week module of this one credit, repeatable course will focus on a different prototyping tool and evaluation method. This class develops a student’s ability to communicate quickly visually before committing to code and design, and to create participant-centered works based on usability-testing results.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 36-2310
    Prerequisites INMD 102 Fundamentals of Interaction  
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 1

  
  •  

    INMD 230 Interactive Advertising Campaign


    Student teams from multiple departments will conduct research, develop strategies, create concepts, and produce interactive advertising campaigns for select products and services. The students will formally present their fully developed interactive campaigns and will have produced work for their portfolios.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 36-2606
    Prerequisites INMD 102 Fundamentals of Interaction  and INMD 114 Web Development I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 250 Topics in Interactive Arts and Media:


    This repeatable course consists of rotating subjects of interest.

    Repeatable: Y
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 6

  
  
  •  

    INMD 263 Physical Computing I


    Course teaches students to read wiring diagrams, as well as design and build basic electronic circuits for general applications. Students use commercially available tools to design, build, and program simple functional devices which produce a physical response (light, sound, or motion) in the environment and interfacing with a computer.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 36-2620
    Prerequisites PROG 101 Introduction to Programming  or PROG 110 Art and Code I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 310 Interface Design II


    Course leverages the broader and interdisciplinary foundational understanding of media-related theories from preceding courses to explore advanced theory and practice of interface design. This course focuses on impressive and environmental models of interaction design, including connected interfaces, smart technology, and experience design. Students produce substantial written critiques as well as prototypes for their own interactive work to demonstrate a literate and evolved understanding of the diverse theories that influence design.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-3110
    Prerequisites INMD 210 Interface Design I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 315 Experience Design


    This course will encourage students to evaluate their own work, as well as the work of others, from the viewpoint of their audience. By gaining an awareness of how the participant experiences their work, students will gain an understanding of how to create engaging, user-centered interfaces.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-3150
    Prerequisites INMD 210 Interface Design I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 320 Wearable Interfaces


    This introductory course focuses on wearable applications of physical computing. Students will use conductive materials, circuits, and sensors to create functional, wearable pieces that incorporate different types of metrics and feedback. Students will explore foundational topics of programming and logic to extend microcontrollers. Students will work in small teams to leverage talent and capabilities from multiple fields of study to create collaborative products and prototypes.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-3020
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 330 Immersive Environments 1


    Examining the historical and contemporary uses of Immersive Environments, students will generate a variety of Immersive Environments using Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality & 360 Video technologies to explore 21st Century alternative modes of spectatorship, in particular immersive and interactive ways of experiencing visual spectacle.

    Repeatable: N
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 335 Immersive Environments 2


    Continued explorations of Immersive and interactive visual engagement using Video Projection Mapping technology and on-site creative practice. Designing immersive environmental projects for institutions, galleries and public forums, artist/ practitioners develop idiosyncratic and dynamic animated visual sculptures and art showcases. By developing a more nuanced and flexible definition of public art spectacle, authors can produce multipurpose animated Projection Art and showcase evolving Immersive Video Environments.

    Repeatable: N
    Prerequisites INMD 330 Immersive Environments 1  
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 340 Emergent Web Technologies


    The internet includes a perpetually evolving set of technologies and production practices that include design conventions, programming languages, and media techniques. Course builds on previously developed skills in Web Development II by using them in new contexts focusing on a specific current emergent Web technology.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-3444
    Prerequisites INMD 214 Web Development II  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 350 Digital Product Planning & Design


    Successful digital products solve a problem held by an identifiable group of people. Identifying the problem, the potential solutions, and knowing how to identify and reach the target market are all essential elements of a digital product launch. Students will have the opportunity to explore the foundational concepts and practices of both user and market research and will gain valuable experience pitching their ideas. Multidisciplinary teams research, plan, design and rapidly build a digital product and pitch their ideas to professionals including product and user experience experts, start-up team members and investors, and digital entrepreneurs.

    Repeatable: Y
    Prerequisites INMD 114 Web Development I  or INMD 210 Interface Design I  
    Requirements Junior Standing or Above (JR)
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 355 Information Architecture


    This course provides insight into the way we sort and categorize data, and how these different schema impact the user experience. Students will explore multiple concepts of organizational techniques, and introduce the student to methods for effectively assessing and creating their own organizational structures to optimize the user experience.

    Repeatable: N
    Formerly 36-3515
    Prerequisites INMD 210 Interface Design I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 360 Advanced Topics in Interaction Design


    This is an Advanced topics course in Interaction Design. Different sections of this course will focus on different topic areas related to Interaction Design that are not taught in other classes. Please contact the department for specifics on the content of each topic.

    Repeatable: Y
    Minimum Credits 1 Maximum Credits 3

  
  •  

    INMD 363 Physical Computing II


    Students learn how to network microprocessors and computers together to control interactive media environments and/or physical objects. Students work on project to explore USB, Ethernet, Wifi, Bluetooth, and XBee networking. Students work on a final project reflecting on their own interest, to develop a device of environment for controlling a second physical or virtual environment.

    Repeatable: Y
    Formerly 36-3630
    Prerequisites INMD 263 Physical Computing I  
    Minimum Credits 3 Maximum Credits 3

 

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